top of page

Artists painting and art lovers

Public·8 members

The Device



The Device is a 2014 American science fiction horror film directed by Jeremy Berg. It stars Angela DiMarco and Kate Alden as sisters who must deal with an alien abduction after one's husband, played by David S. Hogan, becomes obsessed with a strange device.




The Device



Still recovering from a family tragedy in the past, two sisters return home to settle their dead mother's affairs. In a nearby forest, they come upon a strange device. The husband of one of the women becomes obsessed with it despite their demands that he get rid of it. After they experience nightmares and other phenomena, they come to believe it may be the result of the device. It is eventually revealed to be of alien origin, and the sisters are abducted.


Each person who wants to market in the U.S., a Class I, II, and III device intended for human use, for which a Premarket Approval application (PMA) is not required, must submit a 510(k) to FDA unless the device is exempt from 510(k) requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) and does not exceed the limitations of exemptions in .9 of the device classification regulation chapters (e.g., 21 CFR 862.9, 21 CFR 864.9). There is no 510(k) form; however, 21 CFR 807 Subpart E describes requirements for a 510(k) submission. Before marketing a device, each submitter must receive an order, in the form of a letter, from FDA which finds the device to be substantially equivalent (SE) and states that the device can be marketed in the U.S. This order "clears" the device for commercial distribution (see The 510(k) Program Guidance).


A 510(k) is a premarket submission made to FDA to demonstrate that the device to be marketed is as safe and effective, that is, substantially equivalent, to a legally marketed device (section 513(i)(1)(A) FD&C Act). Submitters must compare their device to one or more similar legally marketed devices and make and support their substantial equivalence claims. A legally marketed device is a device that was legally marketed prior to May 28, 1976 (preamendments device), or a device which has been reclassified from Class III to Class II or I, a device which has been found SE through the 510(k) process, or a device that was granted marketing authorization via the De Novo classification process under section 513(f)(2) of the FD&C Act that is not exempt from premarket notification requirements. The legally marketed device(s) to which equivalence is drawn is commonly known as the "predicate." Although devices recently cleared under 510(k) are often selected as the predicate to which equivalence is claimed, any legally marketed device may be used as a predicate. . Legally marketed also means that the predicate cannot be one that is in violation of the FD&C Act.


Until the submitter receives an order declaring a device SE, the submitter may not proceed to market the device. Once the device is determined to be SE, it can then be marketed in the U.S. The SE determination is usually made within 90 days and is made based on the information submitted by the submitter.


Please note that FDA does not typically perform 510(k) pre-clearance facility inspections. The submitter may market the device immediately after 510(k) clearance is granted. The manufacturer should be prepared for an FDA quality system (21 CFR 820) inspection at any time after 510(k) clearance.


A claim of substantial equivalence does not mean the new and predicate devices needs to be identical. FDA first establishes that the new and predicate devices have the same intended use and any differences in technological characteristics do not raise different questions of safety and effectiveness. FDA then determines whether the device is as safe and effective as the predicate device by reviewing the scientific methods used to evaluate differences in technological characteristics and performance data. This performance data can include clinical data and non-clinical bench performance data, including engineering performance testing, sterility, electromagnetic compatibility, software validation, biocompatibility evaluation, among other data.


A device may not be marketed in the U.S. until the submitter receives a letter finding the device substantially equivalent. If FDA determines that a device is not substantially equivalent, the applicant may:


The FD&C Act and the 510(k) regulation (21 CFR 807) do not specify who must submit a 510(k). Instead, they specify which actions, such as introducing a device to the U.S. market, require a 510(k) submission.


Please note that all manufacturers (including specification developers) of Class II and III devices and select Class I devices are required to follow design controls (21 CFR 820.30) during the development of their device. The holder of a 510(k) must have design control documentation available for FDA review during a site inspection. In addition, any changes to the device specifications or manufacturing processes must be made in accordance with the Quality System regulation (21 CFR 820) and may be subject to a new 510(k). Additional information is found on the webpage "Is a new 510(k) required for a modification to the device?"


Devices meeting the above criteria are "grandfathered" devices and do not require a 510(k). The device must have the same intended use as that marketed before May 28, 1976. If the device is labeled for a different intended use, then the device is considered a new device and a 510(k) must be submitted to FDA for marketing clearance.


Please note that you must be the owner of the device on the market before May 28, 1976, for the device to be grandfathered. If your device is similar to a grandfathered device and marketed after May 28, 1976, then your device does NOT meet the requirements of being grandfathered and you must submit a 510(k). In order for a firm to claim that it has a preamendments device, it must demonstrate that its device was labeled, promoted, and distributed in interstate commerce for a specific intended use and that intended use has not changed. See Preamendment Status for information on documentation requirements.


The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) has implemented a Third Party Review Program. This program provides an option to manufacturers of certain devices of submitting their 510(k) to private parties (Recognized Third Parties) identified by FDA for review instead of submitting directly to CDRH. For more information on the program, eligible devices and a list of Recognized Third Parties go to Third Party Review Program Information page.


On the bottom of Home Mini, press and hold the factory reset button located below the power cord. Look for a circle etched into the base. After 5 seconds, your device will begin the factory reset process. Continue to hold for about 10 seconds more, until a sound confirms that the device is resetting.


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established classifications for approximately 1,700 different generic types of devices and grouped them into 16 medical specialties referred to as panels. Each of these generic types of devices is assigned to one of three regulatory classes based on the level of control necessary to assure the safety and effectiveness of the device. The three classes and the requirements which apply to them are:


The class to which your device is assigned determines, among other things, the type of premarketing submission/application required for FDA clearance to market. If your device is classified as Class I or II, and if it is not exempt, a 510k will be required for marketing. All devices classified as exempt are subject to the limitations on exemptions. Limitations of device exemptions are covered under 21 CFR xxx.9, where xxx refers to Parts 862-892. For Class III devices, a premarket approval application (PMA) will be required unless your device is a preamendments device (on the market prior to the passage of the medical device amendments in 1976, or substantially equivalent to such a device) and PMA's have not been called for. In that case, a 510k will be the route to market.


Device classification depends on the intended use of the device and also upon indications for use. For example, a scalpel's intended use is to cut tissue. A subset of intended use arises when a more specialized indication is added in the device's labeling such as, "for making incisions in the cornea". Indications for use can be found in the device's labeling, but may also be conveyed orally during sale of the product. A discussion of the meaning of intended use is contained in The 510(k) Program: Evaluating Substantial Equivalence in Premarket Notification [510(k)].


In addition, classification is risk based, that is, the risk the device poses to the patient and/or the user is a major factor in the class it is assigned. Class I includes devices with the lowest risk and Class III includes those with the greatest risk.


As indicated above all classes of devices as subject to General Controls. General Controls are the baseline requirements of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic (FD&C) Act that apply to all medical devices, Class I, II, and III.


To find the classification of your device, as well as whether any exemptions may exist, you need to find the regulation number that is the classification regulation for your device. There are two methods for accomplishing this: go directly to the classification database and search for a part of the device name, or, if you know the device panel (medical specialty) to which your device belongs, go directly to the listing for that panel and identify your device and the corresponding regulation. You may make a choice now, or continue to read the background information below. If you continue to read, you will have another chance to go to these destinations.


If you already know the appropriate panel you can go directly to the CFR and find the classification for your device by reading through the list of classified devices, or if you're not sure, you can use the keyword directory in the PRODUCT CODE CLASSIFICATION DATABASE. In most cases this database will identify the classification regulation in the CFR. You can also check the classification regulations below for information on various products and how they are regulated by CDRH. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
Page de groupe: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page